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May 26, 2021

The United States and China in Southeast Asia: Is Confrontation Inevitable?

Event Series: Asia-Pacific Dialogue Series

The United States and China in Southeast Asia: Is Confrontation Inevitable? Video Player

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Over the past decade, economic growth and geopolitical shifts have increased the importance of Southeast Asia for international trade, finance, and security affairs. Heightened U.S.-China tensions have further highlighted the strategic importance of the region within the wider Asia-Pacific. This online dialogue brought together leading scholars to discuss the strategic stakes for Southeast Asia amid U.S.-China competition and challenges and opportunities for the region moving forward.

This dialogue was co-sponsored by Georgetown University's Initiative for U.S.-China Dialogue on Global Issues and Asian Studies Program in the School of Foreign Service.

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Lynn Kuok is a senior fellow with the International Institute for Strategic Studies. She is a visiting professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and has taught at the U.S. Department of State’s Foreign Service Institute. She is also a senior research fellow at the University of Cambridge.

Satu Limaye is vice president and director of the East West Center in Washington where he created and now directs the Asia Matters for America initiative. He is also senior advisor, China & Indo-Pacific Division at the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA Corp).

Yun Sun is a senior fellow and co-director of the East Asia Program and director of the China Program at the Stimson Center. Her expertise is in Chinese foreign policy, U.S.-China relations and China’s relations with neighboring countries and authoritarian regimes.

Michael Green (moderator) holds the Chair in Modern and Contemporary Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy in the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He also serves as the director of the Asian Studies Program in the School of Foreign Service.